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Irish Writers of the Fantastic celebrated in new poster – available free in Dublin City Library branches

Bram Stoker pic

We have produced a new poster in association with Swan River Press, to celebrate the work of twelve Irish writers of fantasy, from Charles Maturin to Mervyn Wall.

Ask in your local Dublin City library branch for a free copy!

Irish Writers of the fantastic2

 

These are the writers featured:

Charles Maturin

Charles Robert Maturin, novelist and playwright, was born in Fitzwilliam Street on 25 September 1782. In his youth he had a fascination for the gothic novels of Walpole, Radcliffe, and “Monk” Lewis. His early novel, The Milesian Chief (1812), won the praise of Sir Walter Scott; while his play, Bertram (1816), though successful, drew harsh criticism from Coleridge. A lifelong member of the clergy, serving as curate of St. Peter’s Church on Aungier Street, Maturin is now best remembered for his sprawling gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer (1820). Maturin’s great-nephew, Oscar Wilde, paid tribute to the gothic novelist by adopting the name “Sebastian Melmoth” during his final years of exile in France. Maturin died in his home on York Street on 30 October 1824.

Novel

Melmoth the Wanderer (1820)

Short Story

“Leixlip Castle” (1825)

 

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-1873) was born in Dublin on Dominick Street Lower. He spent his youth in Chapelizod and the rural village of Abington, Co. Limerick. He entered Trinity College in 1833 and was called to the Irish Bar in 1839. Instead of pursuing a career in law, Le Fanu purchased and edited several newspapers including The Evening Mail and The Warder. In 1861 he bought the Dublin University Magazine, which he edited until 1869. He retreated from public life on the death of his wife in 1858, and from the seclusion of his Merrion Square home he turned his attention to writing novels. He is best known today for such pioneering weird stories as “An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in and Old House in Aungier Street”, “Green Tea”, and “Carmilla”. His notable novels include The House by the Church-yard (1863), Wylder’s Hand (1864), Uncle Silas (1864) and The Wyvern Mystery (1869). His seminal short story collection, In a Glass Darkly, was published in 1872, less than a year before his death.

Novels and Collections

The House by the Churchyard (1863)

Uncle Silas (1864)

The Wyvern Mystery (1869)

In a Glass Darkly (1872)

Madam Crowl’s Ghost and Other Tales of Mystery (1923)

Short Stories

“Schalken the Painter” (1839)

“The Watcher” (1847)

“An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in an Old House on Aungier Street (1851)

“Ghost Stories of Chapelizod” (1851)

“Green Tea” (1869)

“Carmilla”(1872)

Fitz-James O’Brien

Fitz-James O’Brien was born in Cork on 25 October 1826. Little is known of his early life, though he attended Trinity College and, after a short period in London, emigrated to America around 1851. In New York he joined the artistic Bohemian set, and began writing for various magazines, including Harper’s, Vanity Fair, and Atlantic Monthly. At the outset of the American Civil War in 1861, O’Brien joined the New York National Guard. He was wounded in February 1862, and later died of tetanus on 6 April. His most notable stories and poems were collected in 1881 by his friend and literary executor William Winter. O’Brien’s proto-science fiction stories, such as “The Diamond Lens” and “What Was It?”, are now considered landmarks of the genre.

Collections

The Poems and Stories of Fitz-James O’Brien (1881)

The Wondersmith and Others (2008)

Short Stories

“The Diamond Lens” (1858)

“The Wondersmith” (1859)

“What Was It?” (1859)

“The Demon of the Gibbet” (1881)

Charlotte Riddell

Charlotte Riddell (1832-1906)—who often published as “Mrs. J.H. Riddell”—was born in Carrickfergus, Co. Antrim. In 1855 she moved to London and began producing numerous popular novels, most of which are now out of print. However, it is for her Christmas ghost stories that she is still widely read. Many of her best ghostly fictions were collected in the landmark volume Weird Stories (1882), while her uncollected tales remain a staple of supernatural anthologies to this day. Though she experienced financial hardships later in life, Riddell was still well-regarded and received a pension from the Royal Literary Fund from 1900 until her passing six years later.

The Uninhabited House (1875)

The Haunted River (1877)

Weird Stories (1882)

The Collected Ghost Stories of Mrs J.H. Riddell (1977)

“The Banshee’s Warning” (1867)

“A Strange Christmas Game” (1868)

“The Old House in Vauxhall Walk” (1882)

“Walnut-Tree House (1882)

Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker (1847-1912) was born in Clontarf, Dublin, and educated at Trinity College. As a young man he worked as a civil servant at Dublin Castle, and as an unpaid theatre critic for local newspapers. He is best known today for his classic horror novel Dracula (1897), but during his lifetime he was known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving, and business manager of Irving’s Lyceum Theatre in London. Other notable works include The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903), Personal Reminiscences of Henry Irving (1906), The Lair of the White Worm (1911), and the posthumously published collection Dracula’s Guest and Other Weird Stories (1914).

The Snake’s Pass (1890)

Dracula (1897)

The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903)

The Lady of the Shroud (1909)

Lair of the White Worm (1911)

Dracula’s Guest and Other Weird Stories (1914)

“The Judge’s House” (1891)

“Old Hoggen: A Mystery” (1893)

“Burial of the Rats” (1896)

“Dracula’s Guest” (1914)

 

Lafcadio Hearn

Born on the Greek island of Lefkada, Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) was brought up in both Ireland and England. At nineteen he emigrated to the United States where he became a journalist, first in Cincinnati and later New Orleans. After a sojourn in the French West Indies, he sailed for Japan in 1890. Hearn wrote extensively about his new homeland, its tales, customs, and religions, acting as a bridge between Japan and the Western world. He died in Tokyo where he is buried under his Japanese name, Koizumi Yakumo.

Collections

In Ghostly Japan (1899)

Shadowings (1900)

A Japanese Miscellany (1901)

Kottō: Being Japanese Curios, with Sundry Cobwebs (1902)

Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things (1904)

Short Stories

“Of Ghosts and Goblins” (1894)

“Nightmare-Touch” (1900)

“The Corpse Rider” (1900)

“The Mujina” (1904)

“The Story of Mimi-Nashi-Hōïchi” (1904)

“The Dream of Akinosuké” (1904)

 

Lord Dunsany

Lord Dunsany (Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett; 1878-1957) published his first collection, The Gods of Pegāna, in 1905. He followed this with more than sixty volumes of critically acclaimed stories, novels, plays, poems, and translations. A big-game hunter and a sportsman, Lord Dunsany was also a soldier and a highly ranked chess-player; and was the Byron Professor of English Literature in Athens in 1940-41. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950.

Novels and Collections

The Gods of Pegāna (1905)

The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories (1908)

Plays of Gods and Men (1917)

The King of Elfland’s Daughter (1924)

The Curse of the Wise Woman (1933)

Short Stories

“The Highwayman” (1908)

“Idle Days on the Yann” (1910)

“A Night at an Inn” (1916)

“The Three Sailors’ Gambit” (1916)

“The Two Bottles of Relish (1952)

 

James Stephens

James Stephens was born in Dublin in 1880. Like many young Irish poets of the early twentieth century, Stephens started his career under the tutelage of A.E.; he dedicated his debut poetry collection, Insurrections (1909), to his mentor. In Irish Fairy Tales (1920) and Deirdre (1923), Stephens explored the myths and legends of Ireland. His best remembered books are his Dublin novel The Charwoman’s Daughter (1912) and the philosophical fantasy The Crock of Gold (1912). He died in England in 1950.

Novels and Collections

The Crock of Gold (1912)

The Demi-Gods (1914)

Irish Fairy Tales (1920)

In the Land of Youth (1924)

 

Dorothy Macardle

Dorothy Macardle (1889-1958)—historian, playwright, journalist, and novelist—was born in Dundalk, Co. Louth. She was educated at Alexandra College in Dublin where she later lectured in English literature. She is best remembered for her seminal treatise on Ireland’s struggle for independence, The Irish Republic (1937), but also wrote novels of the uncanny, including The Uninvited (1941), The Unforeseen (1946), and Dark Enchantment (1953). She died in Drogheda and is buried in St. Fintan’s Cemetery, Sutton.

Earth-Bound and Other Supernatural Tales (1924)

The Uninvited (1941)

The Unforeseen (1946)

The Dark Enchantment (1953)

“Samhain” (1924)

“The Prisoner” (1924)

“The Portrait of Roisin Dhu” (1924)

“The Venetian Mirror” (1924)

 

C.S. Lewis

C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) is widely considered a titan of twentieth-century fantasy, due largely to his “Chronicles of Narnia” novels (1950-56), which commenced with The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Though born in Belfast, Lewis is more often associated with Oxford, where he joined the Magdalen College English faculty, and associated with J.R.R. Tolkien and other members of the Inklings literary group. Lewis also explored science fiction in his “Space Trilogy” novels (1938-45), while Christian themes permeate works such as The Screwtape Letters (1942). Lewis is buried at Holy Trinity Church in Headington, Oxford.

Novels

Out of a Silent Planet (1938)

The Screwtape Letters (1942)

That Hideous Strength (1945)

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)

Prince Caspian (1951)

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (1952)

 

Elizabeth Bowen

Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was born in Dublin. In 1930 she inherited the family estate in Bowen Court, in Co. Cork, where she entertained the likes of Virginia Woolf and Eudora Welty. Her novels, non-fiction, and short stories—such as those in The Cat Jumps and Other Stories (1934) and The Demon Lover and Other Stories (1945)—continue to be read and appreciated today. Her ghostly fiction, which made regular appearances in the anthologies of Cynthia Asquith, is akin to that of Henry James in its psychological probity, but briefer, wittier, and more ironic, with a streak of feline cruelty.

Collections

The Cat Jumps and Other Stories (1934)

The Demon Lover and Other Stories (1945)

The Collected Stories of Elizabeth Bowen (1980)

Short Stories

“The Cat Jumps” (1929)

“The Apple Tree” (1931)

“The Demon Lover” (1941)

“Pink May” (1945)

“Hand in Glove” (1952)

 

Mervyn Wall

 

Mervyn Wall (1908-1997) was born in Rathmines, Dublin. He was educated in Belvedere College; Bonn, Germany; and the National University of Ireland where he obtained his B.A. in 1928. After fourteen years in the Civil Service, he joined Radio Éireann as Programme Officer. In 1957 he left Radio Éireann to become Secretary of the Arts Council of Ireland, a position he held until 1975. Widely known during his lifetime as a broadcaster and critic, he is best remembered now for his plays and novels, among them two satirical fantasies set in medieval Ireland, The Unfortunate Fursey (1946) and The Return of Fursey (1948). His book Leaves for the Burning won Denmark’s Best European Novel award in 1952.

Novels and Collections

The Unfortunate Fursey (1946)

The Return of Fursey (1948)

A Flutter of Wings (1974)

Short Stories

“They Also Serve . . . “

“The Demon Angler”

“Cloonaturk”

 

Information compiled by Brian Showers of Swan River Press.

 

The Long Gaze Back is 2018 Dublin: One City One Book Choice

Book cover

Dublin City Council’s Public Library Service is delighted to announce that The Long Gaze Back, An Anthology of Irish Women Writers edited by Sinéad Gleeson, is the Dublin: One City One Book choice for 2018.

Published by New Island, the anthology spans four centuries and features some of Ireland’s most gifted writers.

Sinéad Gleeson said: “I’m thrilled and delighted on behalf of the 30 writers, past and present, that The Long Gaze Back is this year’s Dublin: One City One Book choice. Anthologies are a platform for telling multiple stories and so many of the writers and their work included here are intrinsically connected to Dublin and its people. The book arose from a desire to amplify the voices of women who write, and being chosen for Dublin: One City One Book will help to introduce these talented writers to all kinds of new readers.”

Dublin City Librarian Margaret Hayes added “This collection of stories embraces writers of the past, present and of the future, an anthology of diversity and talent. With themes universal and contemporary, and settings urban and rural, it includes some of our best writers in a genre much loved by the Irish reader and storyteller. Dublin City Libraries wishes to showcase the full catalogue of these women writers, many of whom will be well known to readers but others who may have slipped a little from view and who deserve to be looked at anew.”

A full programme of events will be announced in spring 2018.

The Book

 The Long Gaze Back features short stories by 30 Irish writers, spanning four centuries. It won The Best Irish-Published Book at the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards in 2016. It features short stories by the following writers:

Niamh Boyce, Elizabeth Bowen, Maeve Brennan, Mary Costello, June Caldwell, Lucy Caldwell, Evelyn Conlon, Anne Devlin, Maria Edgeworth, Anne Enright, Christine Dwyer Hickey, Norah Hoult, Mary Lavin, Eimear McBride, Molly McCloskey, Bernie McGill, Lisa McInerney, Belinda McKeon, Siobhán Mannion, Lia Mills, Nuala Ní Chonchúir, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Kate O’Brien, Roisín O’Donnell, E.M. Reapy, Charlotte Riddell, Eimear Ryan, Anakana Schofield, Somerville & Ross, Susan Stairs.

The Editor

Sinéad Gleeson is a writer, editor and freelance broadcaster. Her essays have been published in Granta Magazine, Winter Papers, Gorse Journal, Elsewhere Journal and Banshee. She also writes fiction and poetry, and is the editor two other short story anthologies, The Glass Shore: Short Stories by Women from the North of Ireland, and Silver Threads of Hope. She presents The Book Show on RTÉ Radio 1

 

http://www.dublinonecityonebook.ie

Making Millions by Erika McGann is 2018 Citywide Reading Choice

We are delighted to announce Making Millions by Erika McGann as the 2018 Citywide Reading for Children choice. This exciting adventure story about the Bubble Street Gang is suitable for boys and girls aged 7-9 years.

“I’m so excited and delighted that Making Millions is the 2018 Citywide Read. I live in the heart of the city and I’ve already met and shared stories with a lot of kids through Dublin City Libraries. I’m looking forward to meeting many more and to hearing their stories about secret forts, jumble sales, ghost stories and getting up to (just a little bit of) mischief.” Says Erika.

The aim of the reading campaign is to encourage children to read for pleasure. The initiative is run by Dublin UNESCO City of Literature and Dublin City Council Public Libraries, in partnership with O’Brien Press, and runs from January to March 2018.

There will be author visits to many Dublin City Council branch libraries as well as city-centre based events to promote the campaign. Multiple copies of the book will be available in borrow in Dublin City Libraries from January 2018.  The project is funded by Dublin City Council’s Public Library Service and the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.

The campaign has been running since 2012. Previous books chosen were : Arthur Quinn and the World Serpent (Alan Early); The Nightmare Club series; The Powers (Kevin Stevens); Danger is Everywhere (David O’Doherty and Chris Judge); The Book of Learning (E.R. Murray) and Knights of the Borrowed Dark (Dave Rudden).

The Book

Cass and her best friends, Lex and Nicholas, are the Bubble Street Gang. They investigate crimes, solve mysteries and have brilliant adventures. They’ve even got their own secret clubhouse. Now the gang need money and they have some genius ideas on how to make it.  But Cass also has a mystery to solve. Who is the invisible boy? And why can’t anyone else see him. Join Cass and the Bubble Street Gang as they start Making Millions!

 

MakingMillions

 

Erika McGann credit Lee Furlong Absolute Studios

 

Photo by Lee Furlong

Erika McGann lives in Dublin and spends her time solving mysteries and having brilliant adventures (well, she writes about them anyway). She likes cold weather (because it’s an excuse to drink hot chocolate by the gallon) and cheesy jokes (because cheesy jokes are always funny, even when they’re not funny). Making Millions is the second book in the new series for younger readers called Cass and the Bubble Street Gang.

Erika’s books for older readers include The Demon Notebook (winner of the prestigious Waverton Good Read Award), The Broken Spell, The Watching Wood and The Midnight Carnival.

The Clubhouse Mystery, the first book to feature Cass and the Bubble Street Gang, was published in Spring 2017.

Dublin City Writer in Residence Position

Dublin City Council invites applications for a Writer in Residence, as part of its Culture & Creativity Plan under the Creative Ireland programme.  The residency runs for the period October 2017 to September 2018 and will be managed by Dublin City Public Libraries through the Director of Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, and will be supported in kind by Irish Writers Centre.

The residency is open to published writers working in any genre of fiction for adults and attracts a fee of €10,000 per annum.

 The residency is envisaged as part-time, which will allow time for the writer’s own work, in addition to engagement and interaction with both the general public and, more specifically, with groups attached to Dublin City Public Library branch libraries across the city.

We are very pleased to announce that the writer in residence will have access, at agreed times, to a room in Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square. It is a requirement of the residency that the writer spend at least 4 hours per week working with writing groups based in Dublin City library branches.

Dublin is part of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and was designated as a City of Literature in 2010. The UNESCO designation ‘City of Literature’ recognises excellence and places an obligation on cities to nurture and support their art form locally, nationally and internationally.

Closing date for receipt of applications is September 22nd at 5:00pm, with interviews for shortlisted candidates being held on October 16th

Applications should be submitted in hard copy to:

Alison Lyons

Director Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, Dublin City Libraries, 138-144 Pearse St., Dublin 2

Alison.lyons@dublincity.ie

The Dublin City Writer in Residence is supported by The Creative Ireland Programme, an all-of-Government five-year initiative, from 2017 to 2022, which places creativity at the centre of public policy. Further information on The Creative Ireland Programme from creative.ireland.ie and ireland.ie 

The Dublin City Writer in Residence is also supported in kind by Irish Writers Centre 

Full details are available here:

Call for a Writer in Residence for Dublin City

Dublin in the Coming Times: Completed work now available

Read from a broad selection of original work from emerging and established writers of all ages who took part in Dublin in the Coming Times.

Free creative-writing workshops have been run over the course of the year for adults in a number of Dublin City Public Libraries and other participating organisations include Fighting Words, Science Gallery, Little Museum of Dublin, Axis Ballymun, Croke Park, the Olivier Cornet Gallery, Marsh’s Library and a number of workplaces around the city. A selection of the pieces created in these workshops is featured in these publications.

Poet Michael O’Loughlin to be Writer in Residence of Prague UNESCO City of Literature

We are delighted to announce that Dublin Poet Michael O’Loughlin has been invited by Prague to be the City’s Writer in Residence for the months of September and October 2017. Prague is one of Dublin’s sister Cities of Literature in the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and Michael’s strong connections to Prague, along with his impressive credentials as a poet, have won him this prestigious honour. During his time there, Michael will participate in local literary life and will be asked to submit a text inspired by his visit.

  Continue reading

Metro Éireann, Kenan Institute of Ethics Announce 3rd Annual Intercultural Writing Competition

Metro Éireann, in collaboration with Duke University’s Kenan Institute of Ethics, invites young writers living in Ireland to submit original works of writing to its third annual intercultural writing competition.

Over €3,000 to be won in prizes!

JPEG Metro Éireann - Kenan Institute of Ethic (2)

Announcing the 2017 writing competition, Bill McCarthy, coordinator of the project, said, “Writers between the ages of 14 and 21 – immigrants and non-immigrants – are encouraged to enter submissions that explore the ethical challenges associated with intercultural diversity in Ireland.  Continue reading

Dead in Dun Laoghaire Crime Writing Festival

Dead In Dun Laoghaire brochure image

The inaugural crime writing festival, Dead in Dun Laoghaire, will take place over one day on Saturday 22nd July at The Pavilion Theatre in Dun Laoghaire. With a stellar line-up of international bestsellers and home-grown talent, the festival is a must for all fans of crime fiction.  Continue reading

Nick Laird in conversation with Rick O’Shea

Nick and Rick graphic

Author and poet Nick Laird will chat to RTE broadcaster Rick O’Shea about his latest novel Modern Gods in Hodges Figgis Bookstore, Dawson Street on Thursday 6th July at 6pm. Admission is free but places must be booked by emailing events.hodgesfiggis@hodgesfiggis.ie or by phoning 6774754

“Modern Gods has realer-than-real characters, unexpected turns of plot into unknown corners of the world, and language that finds its way through the darkest moments and states of mind to shine its clear bright light, revelatory and unforgiving. And it encompasses deep–the deepest, thorniest–questions of faith and redemption, fate and forgiveness.” Michael Chabon