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Hot Press Writing Competition for Students

Hot Press has joined forces with Creative Ireland to launch a new national writing competition, which will allow young students to reflect on the influence of social media.
 
Over the past fifteen years, with the rise of social media, the most extraordinary changes have taken place in society. In terms of the way we communicate, a whole new  world has opened up as people make use of Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, Instagram, and a whole host of other platforms and apps.   
There are huge pluses involved, as we our able to connect and communicate faster than ever before. But there have been downsides too, with Fake News dominating elections, social media bullying impacting adversely on individuals, and the culture of social media affecting the way we live our lives.
 
THE CHALLENGE
One of the key objectives of the Creative Ireland Programme is to nurture and develop new creative talent. In Write Here, Write Now, Hot Press and Creative Ireland aim to uncover the best new writing talent in the country.
In Social Media: A Writer’s Tale, we want young people to unleash their imagination and create a story which involves – or which reflects on – the good, the bad, the humorous and the absurd nature of this social and cultural phenomenon.
 
TELLING YOUR TALE
In 500 words or less, we’re asking entrants to lay down their vision, create a fictional world, or reflect on the theme of social media and its impact on our lives in whatever way they think works best. Competition entries can be in the form of stories, poems, songs, monologues, film scripts – or whatever creative medium the entrant chooses.
The competition will be a test of creativity, originality, style – and of the ability to entertain or enthral.
THE JUDGES
Our special panel of writing experts will include the Booker-prize winning D.B.C. Pierre; the multiple award winning crime writer Tana French; recent winner of the Goldsmiths Prize, Mike McCormack; the acclaimed poet Rita Ann Higgins; Hot Press Editor Niall Stokes; and Deputy Editor Stuart Clark.
THE PRIZES
There are separate competitions and prizes for students at Secondary Level (Leaving Certificate 5th and 6th Year & GCSE/A-Level); and Tertiary Level (students who still at college/university, as well as anyone who have finished third level education in the past 12 months).
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
There will be one male and one female winner from both Second and Third Levels, making if four national winners in all. These four overall winners will win an internship in Hot Press, during the spring or summer of 2018. They will also receive a superb Canon PowerShot SX620, a €250 cash prize, a Certificate of Achievement from Write Here, Write Now, and other great prizes. 
There will be more winners too…
Even if you aren’t one of the four winners, there’s a still a chance to come away with some marvellous prizes. Four runners-up, one from each province, will be selected in both Second Level and Third Level categories to receive special prizes. And there will also be prizes for ten additional runners-up – amounting to 22 lucky winners in all.  
GET WRITING!
This fantastic competition is open to anyone throughout Ireland and there is NO ENTRY FEE.
The closing date for completed entries is February 10, 2018.  To submit your entry, log on to: hotpress.com/writeherewritenow  or email writeherewritenow@hotpress.ie 

Patrick Kavanagh

November 30th marks 5o years since the death of Patrick Kavanagh – one of Ireland’s best known and best loved poets. He was born in Monaghan, which inspired many of his poems, but spent a lot of his life in Dublin, where he is best remembered for his poem On Raglan Road. There is a statue of Kavanagh beside Dublin’s Grand Canal, inspired by his poem “Lines written on a Seat on the Grand Canal, Dublin”

O commemorate me where there is water
canal water preferably, so stilly
greeny at the heart of summer. Brother
commemorate me thus beautifully.

More detail about events to commemorate his 50th anniversary at https://patrickkavanaghcountry.com/

Jonathan Swift 350th Anniversary

The Jonathan Swift Festival takes place this weekend in Dublin to celebrate 35o years since the author, satirist and founder of St. Patrick’s University Hospital  was born.

Dublin City Libraries will mark the anniversary with events in several branches.

Jonathan Swift was born in Dublin on 30 November 1667 and is the author of Gulliver’s Travels, the most popular Irish book ever written. To celebrate Swift’s life and legacy, Dublin City Public Libraries will have a programme of talks, exhibition and events as part of a citywide programme for Swift 350 Festival. Join us to find out about the man and ‘the brand’, a Dubliner of world renowned status, a celebrity now as he was 350 years ago.  All the talks and performances are free. Booking is essential.

In a series of illustrated talks Brendan Twomey will describe and celebrate the complexity of Swift’s life, his personality and works unfolding the story of a clergyman, philanthropist, and writer. In addition Enda Leaney, Senior Librarian will give a brief overview of the Dublin City Library & Archives’ extensive Swift Collections, including first editions of Swift’s works, illustrated children’s editions, and rare items relating to the life and work of Jonathan Swift, including Wood’s Halfpenny.

See schedule below.

Illustrated talks

  • Wednesday 8 November at  6.30 pm in Rathmines Library
  • Wednesday 15 November at 6.30 pm in Cabra Library
  • Wednesday 22 November at 6.30 pm in Inchicore Library
  • Wednesday 29 November at 1.00 pm in Pembroke Library
  • Wednesday 29 November at  6.30 pm in Raheny Library

Rags Upon The Poddle – Songs of Jonathan Swift’s Dublin

  • Wednesday 29 November at 1.00pm in the Music Library, Central Library
  • Thursday 30 November at 6.30pm in Rathmines Library.

Contact: Music LibraryCabra Inchicore Pembroke | Raheny | Rathmines

Contributors

  • Brendan Twomey is a retired banker. He is currently a PhD student in TCD working on the topic of Personal Financial Management in early eighteenth-century Ireland. The financial management practices of Jonathan Swift are a central case study within this project. His research interests, and his publications include; the development of early eighteenth century Dublin, Jonathan Swift and the Southern Church of Ireland from disestablishment to the circa 1960.
  • Enda Leaney is a Senior Librarian at the Dublin and Irish Collections, Dublin City Library & Archive. He was educated at Dublin and Oxford. The Dublin City Library & Archive developed the ‘Jonathan Swift & Baile Átha Cliath/Dublin’ exhibition this year to celebrate the 350th anniversary of Swift’s birth.
  • Pádraig Ó Nualláin  is a traditional singer and musician from Dublin. He has long had an interest in history, social history in particular and has combined this with his love of Dublin songs to create a presentation and performance centred around 18th century Dublin songs

Swift and Dublin,  An Exhibition
This exhibition produced by Dublin City Public Libraries for Swift 350 places Swift within the context of his Dublin. From his birthplace in Hoey’s Court, St Werburghs to Trinity College where he was educated from St Patrick’s Hospital which he founded as the first hospital to cater for patients with mental health problems to his final resting place in St Patrick’s Cathedral, where he was Dean.

Exhibition location and dates

  • Rathmines Library  2  – 30 November
  • St Patrick’s Cathedral 20 – 30 November

There will also be two special performances of Lemuel Gulliver by Jerry Fish and Dave Rudden in Charleville Mall library for children from the local schools.

Led by Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin the Jonathan Swift festival is takes place from 23-26 November. It is supported by Failte Ireland and Dublin City Council and collaborates with a number of cultural institutions across the city who have a historic or thematic link to Jonathan Swift’s life and work including Marsh’s Library, Dublin Castle, Christ Church Cathedral, Trinity College, The Irish Writers Centre, and St Patrick’s Mental Health Services.

https://jonathanswiftfestival.ie/about/

Dublin City Writers in Residence

Dublin City Council is pleased to announce that Declan Burke and Elizabeth Reapy have been appointed as Dublin City Writers in Residence. The residency runs for the period October 2017 to September 2018 and will be managed by Dublin City Public Libraries through the Director of Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, and will be supported in kind by The Irish Writers’ Centre.

The residency will allow time for the writers’ own work, in addition to engagement and interaction with both the general public and with groups associated with Dublin City Public Library branch libraries across the city.

Dublin is part of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and was designated as a City of Literature in 2010. The UNESCO designation ‘City of Literature’ recognises excellence and places an obligation on cities to nurture and support their art form locally, nationally and internationally. It reflects a key ambition of the Dublin UNESCO City of Literature Strategic Plan 2016-2018. This programme is an action of the Dublin City Creative Ireland Plan 2017, supported by the Creative Ireland Programme, an all-of-Government five-year initiative, from 2017 to 2022, which places creativity at the centre of public policy. Further information from creative.ireland.ie and ireland.ie

Funding for the project comes from Creative Ireland and the Dublin City Council Decade of Commemorations Programme.

 

New Cities of Literature

64 new cities have joined the UNESCO Creative Cities Network, including 8 new Cities of literature. There are now 28 Cities of Literature in the network.

UNESCO have announced that the following cities will join the Creative Cities of Literature sub-group of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network:

Bucheon (South Korea)

Durban (South Africa)

Lillehammer (Norway)

Manchester (UK)

Milan (Italy)

Quebec (Canada)

Seattle (USA)

Utrecht (Netherlands)

https://en.unesco.org/creative-cities/events/64-cities-join-unesco-creative-cities-network

Irish Writers of the Fantastic celebrated in new poster – available free in Dublin City Library branches

Bram Stoker pic

We have produced a new poster in association with Swan River Press, to celebrate the work of twelve Irish writers of fantasy, from Charles Maturin to Mervyn Wall.

Ask in your local Dublin City library branch for a free copy!

Irish Writers of the fantastic2

 

These are the writers featured:

Charles Maturin

Charles Robert Maturin, novelist and playwright, was born in Fitzwilliam Street on 25 September 1782. In his youth he had a fascination for the gothic novels of Walpole, Radcliffe, and “Monk” Lewis. His early novel, The Milesian Chief (1812), won the praise of Sir Walter Scott; while his play, Bertram (1816), though successful, drew harsh criticism from Coleridge. A lifelong member of the clergy, serving as curate of St. Peter’s Church on Aungier Street, Maturin is now best remembered for his sprawling gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer (1820). Maturin’s great-nephew, Oscar Wilde, paid tribute to the gothic novelist by adopting the name “Sebastian Melmoth” during his final years of exile in France. Maturin died in his home on York Street on 30 October 1824.

Novel

Melmoth the Wanderer (1820)

Short Story

“Leixlip Castle” (1825)

 

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-1873) was born in Dublin on Dominick Street Lower. He spent his youth in Chapelizod and the rural village of Abington, Co. Limerick. He entered Trinity College in 1833 and was called to the Irish Bar in 1839. Instead of pursuing a career in law, Le Fanu purchased and edited several newspapers including The Evening Mail and The Warder. In 1861 he bought the Dublin University Magazine, which he edited until 1869. He retreated from public life on the death of his wife in 1858, and from the seclusion of his Merrion Square home he turned his attention to writing novels. He is best known today for such pioneering weird stories as “An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in and Old House in Aungier Street”, “Green Tea”, and “Carmilla”. His notable novels include The House by the Church-yard (1863), Wylder’s Hand (1864), Uncle Silas (1864) and The Wyvern Mystery (1869). His seminal short story collection, In a Glass Darkly, was published in 1872, less than a year before his death.

Novels and Collections

The House by the Churchyard (1863)

Uncle Silas (1864)

The Wyvern Mystery (1869)

In a Glass Darkly (1872)

Madam Crowl’s Ghost and Other Tales of Mystery (1923)

Short Stories

“Schalken the Painter” (1839)

“The Watcher” (1847)

“An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in an Old House on Aungier Street (1851)

“Ghost Stories of Chapelizod” (1851)

“Green Tea” (1869)

“Carmilla”(1872)

Fitz-James O’Brien

Fitz-James O’Brien was born in Cork on 25 October 1826. Little is known of his early life, though he attended Trinity College and, after a short period in London, emigrated to America around 1851. In New York he joined the artistic Bohemian set, and began writing for various magazines, including Harper’s, Vanity Fair, and Atlantic Monthly. At the outset of the American Civil War in 1861, O’Brien joined the New York National Guard. He was wounded in February 1862, and later died of tetanus on 6 April. His most notable stories and poems were collected in 1881 by his friend and literary executor William Winter. O’Brien’s proto-science fiction stories, such as “The Diamond Lens” and “What Was It?”, are now considered landmarks of the genre.

Collections

The Poems and Stories of Fitz-James O’Brien (1881)

The Wondersmith and Others (2008)

Short Stories

“The Diamond Lens” (1858)

“The Wondersmith” (1859)

“What Was It?” (1859)

“The Demon of the Gibbet” (1881)

Charlotte Riddell

Charlotte Riddell (1832-1906)—who often published as “Mrs. J.H. Riddell”—was born in Carrickfergus, Co. Antrim. In 1855 she moved to London and began producing numerous popular novels, most of which are now out of print. However, it is for her Christmas ghost stories that she is still widely read. Many of her best ghostly fictions were collected in the landmark volume Weird Stories (1882), while her uncollected tales remain a staple of supernatural anthologies to this day. Though she experienced financial hardships later in life, Riddell was still well-regarded and received a pension from the Royal Literary Fund from 1900 until her passing six years later.

The Uninhabited House (1875)

The Haunted River (1877)

Weird Stories (1882)

The Collected Ghost Stories of Mrs J.H. Riddell (1977)

“The Banshee’s Warning” (1867)

“A Strange Christmas Game” (1868)

“The Old House in Vauxhall Walk” (1882)

“Walnut-Tree House (1882)

Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker (1847-1912) was born in Clontarf, Dublin, and educated at Trinity College. As a young man he worked as a civil servant at Dublin Castle, and as an unpaid theatre critic for local newspapers. He is best known today for his classic horror novel Dracula (1897), but during his lifetime he was known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving, and business manager of Irving’s Lyceum Theatre in London. Other notable works include The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903), Personal Reminiscences of Henry Irving (1906), The Lair of the White Worm (1911), and the posthumously published collection Dracula’s Guest and Other Weird Stories (1914).

The Snake’s Pass (1890)

Dracula (1897)

The Jewel of Seven Stars (1903)

The Lady of the Shroud (1909)

Lair of the White Worm (1911)

Dracula’s Guest and Other Weird Stories (1914)

“The Judge’s House” (1891)

“Old Hoggen: A Mystery” (1893)

“Burial of the Rats” (1896)

“Dracula’s Guest” (1914)

 

Lafcadio Hearn

Born on the Greek island of Lefkada, Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) was brought up in both Ireland and England. At nineteen he emigrated to the United States where he became a journalist, first in Cincinnati and later New Orleans. After a sojourn in the French West Indies, he sailed for Japan in 1890. Hearn wrote extensively about his new homeland, its tales, customs, and religions, acting as a bridge between Japan and the Western world. He died in Tokyo where he is buried under his Japanese name, Koizumi Yakumo.

Collections

In Ghostly Japan (1899)

Shadowings (1900)

A Japanese Miscellany (1901)

Kottō: Being Japanese Curios, with Sundry Cobwebs (1902)

Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things (1904)

Short Stories

“Of Ghosts and Goblins” (1894)

“Nightmare-Touch” (1900)

“The Corpse Rider” (1900)

“The Mujina” (1904)

“The Story of Mimi-Nashi-Hōïchi” (1904)

“The Dream of Akinosuké” (1904)

 

Lord Dunsany

Lord Dunsany (Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett; 1878-1957) published his first collection, The Gods of Pegāna, in 1905. He followed this with more than sixty volumes of critically acclaimed stories, novels, plays, poems, and translations. A big-game hunter and a sportsman, Lord Dunsany was also a soldier and a highly ranked chess-player; and was the Byron Professor of English Literature in Athens in 1940-41. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950.

Novels and Collections

The Gods of Pegāna (1905)

The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories (1908)

Plays of Gods and Men (1917)

The King of Elfland’s Daughter (1924)

The Curse of the Wise Woman (1933)

Short Stories

“The Highwayman” (1908)

“Idle Days on the Yann” (1910)

“A Night at an Inn” (1916)

“The Three Sailors’ Gambit” (1916)

“The Two Bottles of Relish (1952)

 

James Stephens

James Stephens was born in Dublin in 1880. Like many young Irish poets of the early twentieth century, Stephens started his career under the tutelage of A.E.; he dedicated his debut poetry collection, Insurrections (1909), to his mentor. In Irish Fairy Tales (1920) and Deirdre (1923), Stephens explored the myths and legends of Ireland. His best remembered books are his Dublin novel The Charwoman’s Daughter (1912) and the philosophical fantasy The Crock of Gold (1912). He died in England in 1950.

Novels and Collections

The Crock of Gold (1912)

The Demi-Gods (1914)

Irish Fairy Tales (1920)

In the Land of Youth (1924)

 

Dorothy Macardle

Dorothy Macardle (1889-1958)—historian, playwright, journalist, and novelist—was born in Dundalk, Co. Louth. She was educated at Alexandra College in Dublin where she later lectured in English literature. She is best remembered for her seminal treatise on Ireland’s struggle for independence, The Irish Republic (1937), but also wrote novels of the uncanny, including The Uninvited (1941), The Unforeseen (1946), and Dark Enchantment (1953). She died in Drogheda and is buried in St. Fintan’s Cemetery, Sutton.

Earth-Bound and Other Supernatural Tales (1924)

The Uninvited (1941)

The Unforeseen (1946)

The Dark Enchantment (1953)

“Samhain” (1924)

“The Prisoner” (1924)

“The Portrait of Roisin Dhu” (1924)

“The Venetian Mirror” (1924)

 

C.S. Lewis

C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) is widely considered a titan of twentieth-century fantasy, due largely to his “Chronicles of Narnia” novels (1950-56), which commenced with The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Though born in Belfast, Lewis is more often associated with Oxford, where he joined the Magdalen College English faculty, and associated with J.R.R. Tolkien and other members of the Inklings literary group. Lewis also explored science fiction in his “Space Trilogy” novels (1938-45), while Christian themes permeate works such as The Screwtape Letters (1942). Lewis is buried at Holy Trinity Church in Headington, Oxford.

Novels

Out of a Silent Planet (1938)

The Screwtape Letters (1942)

That Hideous Strength (1945)

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)

Prince Caspian (1951)

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (1952)

 

Elizabeth Bowen

Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973) was born in Dublin. In 1930 she inherited the family estate in Bowen Court, in Co. Cork, where she entertained the likes of Virginia Woolf and Eudora Welty. Her novels, non-fiction, and short stories—such as those in The Cat Jumps and Other Stories (1934) and The Demon Lover and Other Stories (1945)—continue to be read and appreciated today. Her ghostly fiction, which made regular appearances in the anthologies of Cynthia Asquith, is akin to that of Henry James in its psychological probity, but briefer, wittier, and more ironic, with a streak of feline cruelty.

Collections

The Cat Jumps and Other Stories (1934)

The Demon Lover and Other Stories (1945)

The Collected Stories of Elizabeth Bowen (1980)

Short Stories

“The Cat Jumps” (1929)

“The Apple Tree” (1931)

“The Demon Lover” (1941)

“Pink May” (1945)

“Hand in Glove” (1952)

 

Mervyn Wall

 

Mervyn Wall (1908-1997) was born in Rathmines, Dublin. He was educated in Belvedere College; Bonn, Germany; and the National University of Ireland where he obtained his B.A. in 1928. After fourteen years in the Civil Service, he joined Radio Éireann as Programme Officer. In 1957 he left Radio Éireann to become Secretary of the Arts Council of Ireland, a position he held until 1975. Widely known during his lifetime as a broadcaster and critic, he is best remembered now for his plays and novels, among them two satirical fantasies set in medieval Ireland, The Unfortunate Fursey (1946) and The Return of Fursey (1948). His book Leaves for the Burning won Denmark’s Best European Novel award in 1952.

Novels and Collections

The Unfortunate Fursey (1946)

The Return of Fursey (1948)

A Flutter of Wings (1974)

Short Stories

“They Also Serve . . . “

“The Demon Angler”

“Cloonaturk”

 

Information compiled by Brian Showers of Swan River Press.

 

The Long Gaze Back is 2018 Dublin: One City One Book Choice

Book cover

Dublin City Council’s Public Library Service is delighted to announce that The Long Gaze Back, An Anthology of Irish Women Writers edited by Sinéad Gleeson, is the Dublin: One City One Book choice for 2018.

Published by New Island, the anthology spans four centuries and features some of Ireland’s most gifted writers.

Sinéad Gleeson said: “I’m thrilled and delighted on behalf of the 30 writers, past and present, that The Long Gaze Back is this year’s Dublin: One City One Book choice. Anthologies are a platform for telling multiple stories and so many of the writers and their work included here are intrinsically connected to Dublin and its people. The book arose from a desire to amplify the voices of women who write, and being chosen for Dublin: One City One Book will help to introduce these talented writers to all kinds of new readers.”

Dublin City Librarian Margaret Hayes added “This collection of stories embraces writers of the past, present and of the future, an anthology of diversity and talent. With themes universal and contemporary, and settings urban and rural, it includes some of our best writers in a genre much loved by the Irish reader and storyteller. Dublin City Libraries wishes to showcase the full catalogue of these women writers, many of whom will be well known to readers but others who may have slipped a little from view and who deserve to be looked at anew.”

A full programme of events will be announced in spring 2018.

The Book

 The Long Gaze Back features short stories by 30 Irish writers, spanning four centuries. It won The Best Irish-Published Book at the Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards in 2016. It features short stories by the following writers:

Niamh Boyce, Elizabeth Bowen, Maeve Brennan, Mary Costello, June Caldwell, Lucy Caldwell, Evelyn Conlon, Anne Devlin, Maria Edgeworth, Anne Enright, Christine Dwyer Hickey, Norah Hoult, Mary Lavin, Eimear McBride, Molly McCloskey, Bernie McGill, Lisa McInerney, Belinda McKeon, Siobhán Mannion, Lia Mills, Nuala Ní Chonchúir, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Kate O’Brien, Roisín O’Donnell, E.M. Reapy, Charlotte Riddell, Eimear Ryan, Anakana Schofield, Somerville & Ross, Susan Stairs.

The Editor

Sinéad Gleeson is a writer, editor and freelance broadcaster. Her essays have been published in Granta Magazine, Winter Papers, Gorse Journal, Elsewhere Journal and Banshee. She also writes fiction and poetry, and is the editor two other short story anthologies, The Glass Shore: Short Stories by Women from the North of Ireland, and Silver Threads of Hope. She presents The Book Show on RTÉ Radio 1

 

http://www.dublinonecityonebook.ie

Making Millions by Erika McGann is 2018 Citywide Reading Choice

We are delighted to announce Making Millions by Erika McGann as the 2018 Citywide Reading for Children choice. This exciting adventure story about the Bubble Street Gang is suitable for boys and girls aged 7-9 years.

“I’m so excited and delighted that Making Millions is the 2018 Citywide Read. I live in the heart of the city and I’ve already met and shared stories with a lot of kids through Dublin City Libraries. I’m looking forward to meeting many more and to hearing their stories about secret forts, jumble sales, ghost stories and getting up to (just a little bit of) mischief.” Says Erika.

The aim of the reading campaign is to encourage children to read for pleasure. The initiative is run by Dublin UNESCO City of Literature and Dublin City Council Public Libraries, in partnership with O’Brien Press, and runs from January to March 2018.

There will be author visits to many Dublin City Council branch libraries as well as city-centre based events to promote the campaign. Multiple copies of the book will be available in borrow in Dublin City Libraries from January 2018.  The project is funded by Dublin City Council’s Public Library Service and the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.

The campaign has been running since 2012. Previous books chosen were : Arthur Quinn and the World Serpent (Alan Early); The Nightmare Club series; The Powers (Kevin Stevens); Danger is Everywhere (David O’Doherty and Chris Judge); The Book of Learning (E.R. Murray) and Knights of the Borrowed Dark (Dave Rudden).

The Book

Cass and her best friends, Lex and Nicholas, are the Bubble Street Gang. They investigate crimes, solve mysteries and have brilliant adventures. They’ve even got their own secret clubhouse. Now the gang need money and they have some genius ideas on how to make it.  But Cass also has a mystery to solve. Who is the invisible boy? And why can’t anyone else see him. Join Cass and the Bubble Street Gang as they start Making Millions!

 

MakingMillions

 

Erika McGann credit Lee Furlong Absolute Studios

 

Photo by Lee Furlong

Erika McGann lives in Dublin and spends her time solving mysteries and having brilliant adventures (well, she writes about them anyway). She likes cold weather (because it’s an excuse to drink hot chocolate by the gallon) and cheesy jokes (because cheesy jokes are always funny, even when they’re not funny). Making Millions is the second book in the new series for younger readers called Cass and the Bubble Street Gang.

Erika’s books for older readers include The Demon Notebook (winner of the prestigious Waverton Good Read Award), The Broken Spell, The Watching Wood and The Midnight Carnival.

The Clubhouse Mystery, the first book to feature Cass and the Bubble Street Gang, was published in Spring 2017.

Dublin City Writer in Residence Position

Dublin City Council invites applications for a Writer in Residence, as part of its Culture & Creativity Plan under the Creative Ireland programme.  The residency runs for the period October 2017 to September 2018 and will be managed by Dublin City Public Libraries through the Director of Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, and will be supported in kind by Irish Writers Centre.

The residency is open to published writers working in any genre of fiction for adults and attracts a fee of €10,000 per annum.

 The residency is envisaged as part-time, which will allow time for the writer’s own work, in addition to engagement and interaction with both the general public and, more specifically, with groups attached to Dublin City Public Library branch libraries across the city.

We are very pleased to announce that the writer in residence will have access, at agreed times, to a room in Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square. It is a requirement of the residency that the writer spend at least 4 hours per week working with writing groups based in Dublin City library branches.

Dublin is part of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and was designated as a City of Literature in 2010. The UNESCO designation ‘City of Literature’ recognises excellence and places an obligation on cities to nurture and support their art form locally, nationally and internationally.

Closing date for receipt of applications is September 22nd at 5:00pm, with interviews for shortlisted candidates being held on October 16th

Applications should be submitted in hard copy to:

Alison Lyons

Director Dublin UNESCO City of Literature, Dublin City Libraries, 138-144 Pearse St., Dublin 2

Alison.lyons@dublincity.ie

The Dublin City Writer in Residence is supported by The Creative Ireland Programme, an all-of-Government five-year initiative, from 2017 to 2022, which places creativity at the centre of public policy. Further information on The Creative Ireland Programme from creative.ireland.ie and ireland.ie 

The Dublin City Writer in Residence is also supported in kind by Irish Writers Centre 

Full details are available here:

Call for a Writer in Residence for Dublin City

Dublin in the Coming Times: Completed work now available

Read from a broad selection of original work from emerging and established writers of all ages who took part in Dublin in the Coming Times.

Free creative-writing workshops have been run over the course of the year for adults in a number of Dublin City Public Libraries and other participating organisations include Fighting Words, Science Gallery, Little Museum of Dublin, Axis Ballymun, Croke Park, the Olivier Cornet Gallery, Marsh’s Library and a number of workplaces around the city. A selection of the pieces created in these workshops is featured in these publications.