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Heaney-Milosz Literary Residency in Krakow, Poland

Heaney-Miłosz Residency – a new literary Residency programme launched on 6 July in Krakow, Poland, by the Estate of Seamus Heaney, the Embassy of Ireland in Poland and Krakow Festival Office (KBF). This Residency will take place for a period of 4-6 weeks in autumn 2023 at the former apartment of one of Poland’s most renowned writers and Nobel Laureate, Czesław Miłosz, in Krakow. 

The Residency is open to early to mid-career writers, who are focussed on creative writing, including poetry in particular.

To be eligible to apply, applicants must:

– Be resident on the island of Ireland.

– Provide evidence of work previously published, available in English

 The following would also be considered desirable for applicants:

– Good knowledge of and/or interest in Poland or Central and Eastern Europe more broadly.

 

The Residency aims to celebrate the friendship between Seamus Heaney and Czesław Miłosz, by providing the time and space for an early to mid-career writer, based in Ireland, to develop their writing.  

The Call for Applications and the Application form are now open and available here:. Heaney-Miłosz Residency in Kraków | Poland – Literary residencies (literaryresidenciespoland.pl)

Applications are open until 30 September 2022, with the selected writer to be announced in December.

 

City of Books Podcast Featuring Catherine Dunne and Lia Mills

Photo of book covers, Catherine Dunne and Lia Milla

HIDDEN TRUTHS

“Fiction sometimes unearths truths – and truths we’re not even aware of knowing,” says novelist Catherine Dunne.

She’s talking about her novel, A Name For Himself, and Lia Mills’s novel Another Alice, reissued in new editions as part of the Arlen House Classic Literature. Both were published originally in the 1990s, but their themes of coercive control and an abused childhood remain relevant today.

Lia Mills tells the City of Books podcast, hosted by Martina Devlin, why she wrote her book as fiction rather than a non-fiction work. “Fiction can change us.,” she says. “It’s an education in empathy – setting aside what you think you know and experiencing what another person is experiencing.”

For Catherine, it’s a question of understanding something more instinctively when it’s read as fiction. “A newspaper report can tell you the facts of the case but paradoxically fiction gets to the truth of the case. I think fiction allows us to go into all those dark corners and explore them in a way people understand the emotional truth. I remember someone saying that a good novel is neurologically the closest we can get to being present in a situation.”

Both writers, who are close friends, also talk about their favourite books by one another. Also featured in the Arlen House classics series is work by Kate O’Brien, Annie Smithson and Marian Thérèse Keyes.

City of Books is sponsored by Dublin UNESCO City of Literature.

LISTEN HERE

 

Granada UNESCO City of Literature International Writers in Residence Programme 2022

Granada UNESCO City of Literature invites applications for its Writer in Residency programme open to writers anywhere.

 

They are offering one month’s stay (30 nights) in Granada for two writers, between November 3 and December 2, 2022, at the Corrala de Santiago of the University of Granada.

Granada UNESCO City of Literature will cover the travelling expenses of each of the writers selected.

The University of Granada will arrange and cover the costs of accommodation for the two writers. Each will have their own room with full board at the university’s hall of residence for visitors (Corrala de Santiago).

Granada UNESCO City of Literature and the University of Granada will provide the writers in residence with opportunities to participate in the city’s literary life, arranging contacts with local writers, involvement in workshops, teaching activities, and so on.

Closing Date 1st September 2022

Dates of Residency: 3rd November to 2nd Decemeber 2022.

Criteria and application form at the following link

https://granadaciudaddeliteratura.com/en/2022-granada-writers-in-residence-programme/

Writer in Residence Opportunity in Prague

PRAGUE CITY OF UNESCO LITERATURE – CREATIVE TWO-MONTH RESIDENCE 2023

The Prague City of Literature project offers residencies for foreign writers and translators. There are six residences available for 2023, each lasting two months.

Prague City of Literature pays the resident a return ticket, provides free accommodation and a scholarship of CZK 15,000 (approx. EUR 600) per month.

Do you have a breathtaking project that you would like to work on during your stay in Prague?

Sign up now!

Deadline: Wednesday 31 August 2022, 12:00 CET.

https://www.unescoprague.org/rezidencni-pobyty-2023/

 

Bloomsday: Ulysses Readings and Songs

 

16 June | 3pm – 6pm | Free, no booking required 

Meeting House Square, Temple Bar
 
A long-standing and treasured tradition, this afternoon of songs, readings and performances from Ulysses in the heart of the city is an essential part of the Bloomsday experience. Featuring a fabulously chaotic cast of noted Irish actors, politicians, musicians, pundits, procrastinators and everyone in between, this is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the book amongst seasoned Joycean veterans and Bloomsday beginners alike.
 
This year, we have Katherine Lynch at the helm in Temple Bar in the heart of Joyce’s Dublin. It will be a gorgeous afternoon to sit back and listen to all the fun and wonder of James Joyce’s Ulysses.
 
This event is supported by Failte Ireland, the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts , Sports and Media, Dublin City Council and UNESCO Dublin City of Literature.

Make everyday a Bloomsday – 28th International James Joyce Symposium

To celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the publication of Ulysses, Trinity College Dublin and University College Dublin are welcoming over 300 Joyceans from around the world to return once again to the city he situated so durably and resoundingly on the literary map.

The event taking place between June 12-18 will see academics, authors, film makers and composers share their Joycean research and creative projects as the world takes stock of a hundred years of Ulysses.

Over 250 academic papers will be delivered at the week long conference. Experts will thrash out topics including the book’s influence on contemporary Irish women writers such as Sally Rooney and Ruth Gilligan; what the representation of stout and bass in Ulysses can tell us about imperial soft power; and reading James Joyce in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

The public programme started  Monday, June 13 with author Mark O’Connell talking about living with Joyce in Dublin and how to make every day a Bloomsday. Entitled ‘Every Day is Bloomsday: Living with Joyce in Dublin’ he will talk about how Joyce’s work has informed and complicated his relationship with Dublin, in all its frustrations and pleasures. The city of Dublin, he says, can seem a vast monument to Joyce’s writing.

Later day (June 13) composer Roger Doyle discussed his piece ‘Finnegans Wake: Suite of Affections’ with renowned Joycean Vincent Deane. Also on Monday, the Samuel Beckett Theatre held a talk and demonstration of the influence of the ‘magic lantern’ – a popular form of Victorian entertainment – which influenced Joyce and Ulysses

Bloomsday itself, June 16, will be marked by a free public talk delivered by author Eimear McBride on ‘Joyce, Joy and Enjoying Ulysses Still’. This will be followed by a discussion between novelists Nuala O’Connor and Mary Morrissy entitled ‘Reimagining Nora’.

Earlier in the day there will be a preview screening of a major new documentary to mark the 100th anniversary of Ulysses entitled ‘Arena: James Joyce’s Ulysses’. This will be followed by a Q&A with the director Adam Low and producer Martin Rosenbaum.

Dr Sam Slote, Associate Professor, School of English, Trinity and one of the organisers of the symposium said:

“David Bowie once said that the thing he admired about John Lennon was how he made the avant-garde accessible to a wider audience. The same would be true of Bowie himself and also of James Joyce and Ulysses. Despite its fearsome reputation, Ulysses is a book enjoyed by many people all over the world, and not despite of Joyce’s stylistic innovations but because of them. Joyce uses his mastery of language to express the complexities of human emotion and psychology. His novel is not just for the professors, but for everyone, not just for Dubliners but the world.”

PUBLIC EVENTS

Mon 13 June: 16.00–17.00

Burke theatre, Arts building

Mark O’Connell: Every Day is Bloomsday: Living with Joyce in Dublin

Chair: Sam Slote (Trinity College Dublin)

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed

Mon 13 June: 19.00–21.00

The Trinity Long Room Hub

Finnegans Wake: Suite of Affections. A Dialogue with Composer Roger Doyle and Vincent Deane

Free, but advance booking is required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/finnegans-wake-suite-of-affections-with-roger-doyle-vincent-deane-tickets-320691746647

Mon 13 June: 19.00–21.00

Samuel Beckett Theatre

Ulysses – A Magic Lantern Odyssey

Tickets €15, book at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ulysses-a-magic-lantern-odyssey-tickets-344782412477

Thurs 16 June: 11.00–12.30

Burke theatre, Arts building

‘Arena: James Joyce’s Ulysses

A preview screening of a new documentary to mark the 100th anniversary of Ulysses. A DoubleBand/Lone Star Co-production for BBC Arts and BBC Northern Ireland with the support of Northern Ireland Screen. With Q&A with the director Adam Low and producer Martin Rosenbaum.

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed                 

Thurs 16 June: 14.00–15.00

Burke theatre, Arts building

Eimear McBride: Joyce, Joy and Enjoying Ulysses Still

Chair: Jarlath Killeen (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed

Thurs 16 June: 15.30–16.30

Burke theatre, Arts building

Reimagining Nora: Nuala O’Connor and Mary Morrissy

Chair: Anne Fogarty (University College Dublin, Ireland)

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed

The full programme is available here:

https://www.tcd.ie/English/ulysses-100/

A new documentary on the 100th anniversary of the publication of Ulysses and Joycean musings on Guinness, the #MeToo movement and Sally Rooney are all part of the eclectic and busy programme of the 28th International James Joyce Symposium being held in Dublin this week.

To celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the publication of Ulysses, Trinity College Dublin and University College Dublin are welcoming over 300 Joyceans from around the world to return once again to the city he situated so durably and resoundingly on the literary map.

The event taking place between June 12-18 will see academics, authors, film makers and composers share their Joycean research and creative projects as the world takes stock of a hundred years of Ulysses.

Over 250 academic papers will be delivered at the weeklong conference. Experts will thrash out topics including the book’s influence on contemporary Irish women writers such as Sally Rooney and Ruth Gilligan; what the representation of stout and bass in Ulysses can tell us about imperial soft power; and reading James Joyce in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

The public programme started yesterday, Monday, June 13 with author Mark O’Connell talking about living with Joyce in Dublin and how to make every day a Bloomsday. Entitled ‘Every Day is Bloomsday: Living with Joyce in Dublin’ he will talk about how Joyce’s work has informed and complicated his relationship with Dublin, in all its frustrations and pleasures. The city of Dublin, he says, can seem a vast monument to Joyce’s writing.

Later day (June 13) composer Roger Doyle discussed his piece ‘Finnegans Wake: Suite of Affections’ with renowned Joycean Vincent Deane. Also on Monday, the Samuel Beckett Theatre held a talk and demonstration of the influence of the ‘magic lantern’ – a popular form of Victorian entertainment – which influenced Joyce and Ulysses

Bloomsday itself, June 16, will be marked by a free public talk delivered by author Eimear McBride on ‘Joyce, Joy and Enjoying Ulysses Still’. This will be followed by a discussion between novelists Nuala O’Connor and Mary Morrissy entitled ‘Reimagining Nora’.

Earlier in the day there will be a preview screening of a major new documentary to mark the 100th anniversary of Ulysses entitled ‘Arena: James Joyce’s Ulysses’. This will be followed by a Q&A with the director Adam Low and producer Martin Rosenbaum.

Dr Sam Slote, Associate Professor, School of English, Trinity and one of the organisers of the symposium said:

“David Bowie once said that the thing he admired about John Lennon was how he made the avant-garde accessible to a wider audience. The same would be true of Bowie himself and also of James Joyce and Ulysses. Despite its fearsome reputation, Ulysses is a book enjoyed by many people all over the world, and not despite of Joyce’s stylistic innovations but because of them. Joyce uses his mastery of language to express the complexities of human emotion and psychology. His novel is not just for the professors, but for everyone, not just for Dubliners but the world.”

PUBLIC EVENTS

Mon 13 June: 16.00–17.00

Burke theatre, Arts building

Mark O’Connell: Every Day is Bloomsday: Living with Joyce in Dublin

Chair: Sam Slote (Trinity College Dublin)

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed

Mon 13 June: 19.00–21.00

The Trinity Long Room Hub

Finnegans Wake: Suite of Affections. A Dialogue with Composer Roger Doyle and Vincent Deane

Free, but advance booking is required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/finnegans-wake-suite-of-affections-with-roger-doyle-vincent-deane-tickets-320691746647

Mon 13 June: 19.00–21.00

Samuel Beckett Theatre

Ulysses – A Magic Lantern Odyssey

Tickets €15, book at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ulysses-a-magic-lantern-odyssey-tickets-344782412477

Thurs 16 June: 11.00–12.30

Burke theatre, Arts building

‘Arena: James Joyce’s Ulysses

A preview screening of a new documentary to mark the 100th anniversary of Ulysses. A DoubleBand/Lone Star Co-production for BBC Arts and BBC Northern Ireland with the support of Northern Ireland Screen. With Q&A with the director Adam Low and producer Martin Rosenbaum.

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed                 

Thurs 16 June: 14.00–15.00

Burke theatre, Arts building

Eimear McBride: Joyce, Joy and Enjoying Ulysses Still

Chair: Jarlath Killeen (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland)

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed

Thurs 16 June: 15.30–16.30

Burke theatre, Arts building

Reimagining Nora: Nuala O’Connor and Mary Morrissy

Chair: Anne Fogarty (University College Dublin, Ireland)

Free and open to the public; no reservation needed

The full programme is available here:

https://www.tcd.ie/English/ulysses-100/

Special Episode – City of Books Podcast with Martina Devlin

City of Books image with Martina Devlin and Edith book cover

SOMERVILLE AND ROSS – LOVE AND LOSS

“They were great friends, they encouraged each other and had so much fun,” Martina Devlin says of Irish R.M. co-authors Somerville and Ross. But she saw no reason to push them into bed together in her new novel Edith because she found no evidence they were “pioneering lesbians”.

In the latest episode of the City of Books podcast, Martina hands over the microphone to guest interviewer and One Dublin One Book author Nuala O’Connor. She tells Nuala that Somerville and Ross’s relationship was a form of love. She adds: “I think it’s actually quite misogynistic to suggest that two women who collaborate together and support each other have also to be lovers. There are many kinds of love.”

Nuala said when she wrote Miss Emily about the poet Emily Dickinson she came across similar, intense female friendships which weren’t necessarily physical.

Somerville mourned Ross deeply after her death in 1915, and suffered a crisis of confidence about her ability to write. She overcame it by convincing herself they could communicate beyond the grave, and believed she continued to collaborate on books with Ross through spiritualism.

The novel is set in 1921-2 against a backdrop of big houses being burned down during the civil unrest leading to irish independence, and follows Edith’s attempts to save both home – Drishane House – and literary career.

Edith: A Novel by Martina Devlin is published by The Lilliput Press.

More here: https://www.lilliputpress.ie/product/edith-by-martina-devlin

LISTEN HERE

WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY 2022

 

Cities of Literature and Planet Earth – The Heat is On

On World Environment Day, 5 June 2022, Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature is thrilled to be releasing The Heat is On: Young Writers on the Climate Crisis. This free digital anthology of creative writing about the climate crisis facing our planet showcases writers under 20 years of age from across the Cities of Literature Network, including(from Ireland) Emily Keane with “Our Changing Planet”. Their thought-provoking submissions are published in the primary language and in English, and these extraordinary words and images will stay with you always.

In September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that included tackling the world-wide emergency that is climate change. As the impacts of the climate crisis intensify with each passing year, more and more young people around the globe are joining the movement for positive change. By leading the discussion around climate change, they are also spreading awareness and motivating others to demand action for a clean and healthy planet.

Kicking off the anthology is a foreword by Vicki Soanes, Secretary General, New Zealand National Commission for UNESCO in which she highlights both the values of the organisation and how this body of writing supports these goals. Mayor of Dunedin Aaron Hawkins writes a stirring introduction in which he shares his pride in Ōtepoti Dunedin and our City of Literature status while raising his concerns for future generations as a parent of a young child. An original waiata ‘Huia te aroha’, performed against the coastal backdrop of Otakou Marae, welcomes readers and provides a powerful start to the other pearls of wisdom to follow.

Beautifully produced and enhanced by original artworks, collage and photography, The Heat is On will be published on World Environment Day for all to share and celebrate. Fifteen Cities of Literature around the globe have joined together to create this special volume. 

These extraordinary words and images will stay with you always 

The Heat is On

#WorldEnvironmentDay
#CitiesofLiterature

The Art of Losing by Alice Zeniter Wins 2022 Dublin Literary Award

Dublin City Council announces The Art of Losing by Alice Zeniter, translated by Frank Wynne as winner of the 2022 DUBLIN Literary Award

Monday 23rd May 2022: French author Alice Zeniter and Irish translator Frank Wynne have been announced today as winners of the 2022 DUBLIN Literary Award, sponsored by Dublin City Council, for the novel The Art of Losing (published by Picador, Pan MacMillan). The Award is the world’s largest prize for a single novel published in English.

Uniquely, the Award receives its nominations from public libraries in cities around the globe and recognises both writers and translators. Author Alice Zeniter receives €75,000 and Frank Wynne, as translator, receives €25,000.  Frank was a previous winner in 2002, as translator of Atomised by Michel Houellebecq. The Art of Losing is the 10th novel in translation to win the Dublin Literary Prize.

The winning title was announced today at a special event, at International Literature Festival Dublin, which runs until 29th May.  Lord Mayor and Patron of the Award, Alison Gilliland made the announcement and Owen Keegan, Chief Executive of Dublin City Council, presented the prizes to Alice and Frank at the International Literature Festival Dublin Literary Village in Merrion Square Park.

Lord Mayor and Patron of the Award, Alison Gilliland remarked:

With its themes of colonisation and immigration, The Art of Losing, which follows three generations of an Algerian family from the 1950s to the present day, highlights how literature can increase our understanding of the world. I’d like to congratulate Alice Zeniter and Frank Wynne and thank all who are involved in the award – writers, translators, librarians, publishers and the administrative staff of Dublin City Council.”

Nominated by Bibliothèque publique d’information, in the Pompidou Centre, Paris, the winning novel was chosen from a shortlist of six novels by writers from Ireland, Nigeria, New Zealand, France and Canada. 

The longlist of 79 titles was nominated by 94 libraries from 40 countries across Africa, Europe, Asia, the US, Canada, South America, Australia and New Zealand.

Accepting her award, winner Alice Zeniter said:

When I was writing the Art of Losing, I was almost certain that it was a niche novel. This book’s life, even five years after its release, keeps surprising me. I am really happy and thrilled that the Dublin Literary Award shows me today that this story can be shared with readers from different countries, readers who grew up outside the French post-colonial Empire. Readers that, maybe, had never thought about Algeria before opening the book. How crazy is that?

Translator Frank Wynne:

“In a very real sense, I owe my career as a literary translator to the Dublin Literary Award, a prize I cherish because it makes no distinction between English and translated fiction, treating authors and translators as co-weavers of the  endless braid of literature.”

 Alice Zeniter and Frank Wynne will appear at  ILFDublin, for an in-depth conversation about the novel, with Michael Cronin, Professor of French and Director of the Centre for Literary and Cultural Translation in Trinity College Dublin, this evening (Monday 23rd May) at 6pm in Merrion Square Park (Speranza stage).

Book to attend in person or online :

 https://ilfdublin.com/whats-on/festival/strand/writenow/2022-dublin-literary-award-winner-in-conversation/

Copies of the winning title are available to borrow from Dublin City Libraries and from public libraries throughout Ireland. Readers can also borrow the winning novel on BorrowBox: in eBook format. The French version will also be available to borrow from Dublin City Libraries. Further details about the Award and the winning novel are available on the Award website at www.dublinliteraryaward.ie

The 2022 Judging Panel, which is led by Professor Chris Morash of Trinity College Dublin, and includes Emmanuel Dandaura, Sinéad Moriarty, Clíona Ní Riordáin, Alvin Pang and Victoria White, commented:

The Art of losing offers insights at every scale, from the national and the individual, about the fluid nature of identity; how our relations to place and to each other situate and perhaps free us.”

Alice Zeniter is a French novelist, translator, scriptwriter and director. Her novel Take This Man was published in English by Europa Editions in 2011. Zeniter has won many awards for her work in France, including the Prix Littéraire de la Porte Dorée, the Prix Renaudot des Lycéens and the Prix Goncourt des Lycéens, which was awarded to The Art of Losing. She lives in Brittany.

Frank Wynne is an Irish translator who has translated and published comics and graphic novels and began translating literature in the late 1990s. He has translated works by, among others, Michel Houellebecq, Frédéric Beigbeder and Ahmadou Kourouma, and has won a number of awards, including the DUBLIN Literary Award 2002, Scott Moncrieff Prize and the Premio Valle Inclán.

 

About, The Art of Losing by Alice Zeniter (French).

Naïma has always known that her family came from Algeria – but up until now, that meant very little to her. Born and raised in France, her knowledge of that foreign country is limited to what she’s learned from her grandparents’ tiny flat in a crumbling French sink estate: the food cooked for her, the few precious things they brought with them when they fled.

On the past, her family is silent. Why was her grandfather Ali forced to leave? Was he a harki – an Algerian who worked for and supported the French during the Algerian War of Independence? Once a wealthy landowner, how did he become an immigrant scratching a living in France?

Naïma’s father, Hamid, says he remembers nothing. A child when the family left, in France he re-made himself: education was his ticket out of the family home, the key to acceptance into French society.

But now, for the first time since they left, one of Ali’s family is going back. Naïma will see Algeria for herself, will ask the questions about her family’s history that, till now, have had no answers.

Full citation from the 2022 judging panel on The Art of Losing

“Symphonic in historical and emotional scope, the novel is by turns infuriating, unflinching, wry, recalcitrant, sensual, aporetic, courageous. It offers insights at every scale, from the national and the individual, about the fluid nature of identity; how our relations to place and to each other situate and perhaps free us. Refusing easy answers, pat politics and cultural caricatures while acknowledging their presence and seductive power in our time, The Art of Losing is a loving and clear-eyed sifting of the stories we tell ourselves (and what we leave unspoken) in order to make sense of who we are in the world.”

 

City of Books Podcast Featuring Sara Baume

Photo credit: Kenneth O’Halloran

 

STEPPING BACK

Despite winning critical success with each of her books, writer and visual artist Sara Baume says, “I’ll always feel like a failed artist rather than a successful writer.”

But, typically reflective, this highly original author adds: “Perhaps carrying that is useful in some way.”

She tells the City of Books podcast that she doesn’t show much of her art: “It all sits in my art room of junk.” However, working with her hands is important to her.

Art themes include handmade birds – featured in her last book, the non-fiction work Handiwork – and tiny container ships which reflect her concerns about over-consumption. When she looks at the real life versions of those ships, she thinks about all the boxes inside them.

Sara is unafraid to use her own life in her writing, while insisting on its status as fiction, and does so again in her new book Seven Steeples, a gentle and thought-provoking novel spanning seven years. It’s about a couple and their two rescue dogs who drop off the radar and live a quiet life doing as little harm to the planet as possible.

“Everything I write is always an extremity of my actual existence. It’s sort of like a smudged out version of us, I suppose, and becomes less like us as the book goes on,” says Sara, who moved to the countryside 11 years ago and currently lives with her partner in West Cork.

Modestly, she tells podcast presenter Martina Devlin that she lacks the flair to invent stories and “perhaps I don’t have a busy enough life” to borrow details from the people she meets, like other writers. So she needs to harvest her own, even as she transforms it.

Seven Steeples by Sara Baume is published by Tramp Press https://tramppress.com/product/seven-steeples/

City of Books is sponsored by Dublin UNESCO City of Literature.

LISTEN HERE